michelledetorie:

books! are! here! 

After-Cave https://ahsahtapress.org/product/after-cave/

A feminist, feral-poetic odyssey,  purring and covered in mud, After-Cave invites the reader to move with its possibly human, possibly alive narrator toward a discovery of livability. More pressing than hunger in this universe is the need to know what cruelty means and how one might live in its absence. How to make this impossibility hospitable and thereby, in one’s way, to prepare oneself to meet ones friends: human, animal, the always alive and the already dead. A hybrid text, After-Cave contains experiments in sound and syntax, language that moves like weather systems and migratory birds, troubling notions of linear time and traversing the spaces of human-made and “natural” disaster.

(via womenandanimalsnotebook)


jeandonnelly:

The older I get the more relatives I see looking back at me in my selfies. Perhaps living into the dark mysteries of the dissolution of my parents marriage - the cycles of spectacular betrayals and guilt-induced abuse in my own - while parenting boundlessly hopeful, myopic, tender, and resilient adolescents for whom everything will be new or be made to seem new by them - for them in a world they believe can and will change - I can’t help but see all of my grandparents - living and long passed - their individual features I see reminding me of - what Fanny Howe calls - their “radical love” - flawed, omitted, distorted, coveted, flung out under rages or exquisitely shared, rejected or returned.
Giorgio Agamben writes, “the only possible city is a face.” The one the I asks to touch and does so with no apparent or residual struggle. Then the you will be a city delivering a letter on how to care for one another.
In his collection “Our Face” - or perhaps it translates “Whole Face” - Henri Meschonnic wrote - and this is my feeble translation -
my wonder now is now
the future is so much
in us in
speech
it might resemble  us or I
find everyone each is
us this discovery in
a face
cradling silence that says more than
formed
words to hear I
continue and hear
its speech inaudible force
and endless

jeandonnelly:

The older I get the more relatives I see looking back at me in my selfies. Perhaps living into the dark mysteries of the dissolution of my parents marriage - the cycles of spectacular betrayals and guilt-induced abuse in my own - while parenting boundlessly hopeful, myopic, tender, and resilient adolescents for whom everything will be new or be made to seem new by them - for them in a world they believe can and will change - I can’t help but see all of my grandparents - living and long passed - their individual features I see reminding me of - what Fanny Howe calls - their “radical love” - flawed, omitted, distorted, coveted, flung out under rages or exquisitely shared, rejected or returned.

Giorgio Agamben writes, “the only possible city is a face.” The one the I asks to touch and does so with no apparent or residual struggle. Then the you will be a city delivering a letter on how to care for one another.

In his collection “Our Face” - or perhaps it translates “Whole Face” - Henri Meschonnic wrote - and this is my feeble translation -

my wonder now is
now

the future is so much

in us in

speech

it might resemble
us or I

find everyone
each is

us this
discovery in

a face

cradling silence
that says more than

formed

words
to hear I

continue
and hear

its speech
inaudible force

and endless

(via matlaporte)


Rae Armantrout, from NECROMANCE (Sun & Moon, 1991)

Rae Armantrout, from NECROMANCE (Sun & Moon, 1991)


wendyssubway:

An incredible conversation between Lisa Robertson and Aisha Sasha John reposted by Art & Education and entirely worth watching.

Central to their conversation seems to be the character of poetry as a trace of a transmission of thought between bodies and across time, and the experience of reading always as a “beginner”—an experience which is heightened by a fumbling incapability before the opacity of a foreign-language text. This pleasure of difficulty, which changes the encounter with the text and helps to abolish the preconceptions that reading in one’s native language is wont to bring, is connected to notions of intimacy and the complex dynamics of power and identification in Pauline Réage’s canonic S&M novel The Story of O, which forms the topic of one of Robertson’s essays in Nilling, “Lastingness.” “

One of Lisa Robertson’s latest books Thinking Space was printed by the Organism for Poetic Research, which is launching the third issue of their journal PELT at WS this Friday at 8pm.  


Maiden voyage: belt and motor back on, we took it out for our first spin…


Past week: drove up Pike’s Peak with Julia to see the aspens beginning to change. J knows I get nervous w/heights, so she crawls out on every ledge. Also, my neighbor Jim and I rewired the motor for the Heidelberg and it spun right up. Then we made a 220 extension cord so we can run the press off of the outlet for the drier. New rollers and new belt arrived yesterday, so very soon the press will be up and running!


Gus + Creeley

Gus + Creeley


matlaporte:

The protection of sleep
The protection of sheep

Patron of stealthy action
The stealthy

Real and personal property

Paper money and tender acts

Fiction of administrative law
Fathers dare not name me

Chasm dogma scoops out

The invention of law
the codification of money

Democracy and property
Rules and guards and fences

In the court of black earth
to be infinite

- from Singularities by Susan Howe


jeandonnelly:

"Hard to get home; but this is, this travelling
of
is
home.”

Rachel Blau DuPlessis


allisoncobb:

Jean Donnelly broadside with dahlias

Donnelly’s GREEN OIL + Donnelly/Drescher broadside: LAST COPIES!! Get yours here: http://tumblr.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=29e07476f49380932dce530f1&id=7033c7684e&e=718916b3f0

allisoncobb:

Jean Donnelly broadside with dahlias

Donnelly’s GREEN OIL + Donnelly/Drescher broadside: LAST COPIES!! Get yours here: http://tumblr.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=29e07476f49380932dce530f1&id=7033c7684e&e=718916b3f0

(via furtherotherbookworks)


Ted Greenwald, CON DOT (Cuneiform, 2014). Completed the dummy for this book the other day and it looks fucking gorgeous. So thrilled to get to bind it.

Ted Greenwald, CON DOT (Cuneiform, 2014). Completed the dummy for this book the other day and it looks fucking gorgeous. So thrilled to get to bind it.


womenandanimalsnotebook:

from my artist’s statement for After-Cave 

womenandanimalsnotebook:

from my artist’s statement for After-Cave 


cedarmask:

Jess, The young Tell or Y is for mummy, 1966

cedarmask:

Jess, The young Tell or Y is for mummy, 1966